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Does Baidu want to be the Android of self-driving?

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baidu-car

Chinese search giant Baidu announced on Wednesday that it has open sourced its self-driving technology, through a new project named Apollo.

Automakers will be able to look at reference designs for self-driving sensors and use Baidu’s software, which includes a cloud data service to transmit 3D maps and traffic updates to the car.

See Also: Hackers tried to steal Chinese search giant’s autonomous trade secrets

The announcement a few months after Baidu ended a self-driving partnership with BMW, who then went on to partner with Intel and Mobileye.

Baidu has not said how it plans to finance the open source platform, but the addition of a cloud service sounds like one way. Automakers might also be forced to use Baidu as the default search engine, similar to how all Android manufacturers are forced to pre-install Google services.

Automakers will be able to download the platform come July, but it will only be for “restricted environment” driving. At the end of the year, the platform will open to self-driving programs on public roads.

Baidu is aiming for self-driving cars on public roads by 2020. It has been working on the technology for two years now.

“An open, innovative industry ecosystem initiated by Baidu will accelerate the development of autonomous driving in the US and other developed automotive markets,” said Baidu CEO, Qi Lu.

The move takes aim at Google, which has always made its services free to the public and operators. It may force the U.S. search giant to respond, especially if Google wants any chance of succeeding with the tech in China.

Google’s self-driving division, Waymo, has not said how it plans to commercialize its technology.

The post Does Baidu want to be the Android of self-driving? appeared first on ReadWrite.

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Are we going from “Artificial Intelligence” to “Augmented Intelligence?”

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Retro/Vintage robotic toy. 3D render, digital image.

Artificial Intelligence. I can’t think of a reference to the intellect that would feel more unauthentic and fake. It’s no wonder people turn to The Terminator or The Matrix to fathom what it’s all about. Fortunately, after 60 years of AI rumors fueled by academia and movies, we’re finally starting to see signs that it means more than just robots taking over.

Working in the tech industry, it’s ironic that the AI lightbulb clicked not through an understanding of machine learning or engineering — but through the human challenges we face in the technology world.

See also: Look at all the amazing things AI can do for lawyers

While at Yahoo! and Apple, it was amazing to be part of technologies that not only helped enable the modern cloud today but continue to support its more than doubling in performance every year. But on the people side, opening a new data center meant hiring a team with over 100 man-years of various expertise and experience. As these skills became harder and harder to find, we realized that since we couldn’t find more people that had them, we needed to figure out how to get more out of people that didn’t.

We’re living in a world where the evolution of technology is exponentially outpacing that of people. AI is now empowering machines with the intelligence to form its own insights and thoughts. What were sensors are now evolving into senses, where machines can acutely comprehend things like sight, sound, and touch.

The Internet of Things (IoT) is enabling “self-driving” actions to be performed, based on those thoughts and senses. Right in front of our eyes, technology is making the leap from being the inanimate tools of yesterday to serving as our collaborative and conscious AI-powered co-workers of tomorrow. As people, our responsibility is to serve as the manager and mentor of this new form of co-worker.

Using comprehensive human-to-machine learning interfaces, all people will have the ability to effectively teach and mentor our new co-workers using one’s own natural human language. Yes, human knowledge will be the foundation of what makes artificial intelligence real. This is why AI will prove to be more useful as an extension of human intelligence, than a substitution for it. It is then that it will no longer be viewed as Artificial Intelligence, but understood as Augmented Intelligence.

Enter augmented intelligence

AI is going to augment natural human intelligence and enable people to gain the world’s collective expertise while requiring less time and study than what has been required to become an expert in any one thing today. Traditionally in humans, an expert’s mind possesses fewer possibilities for slower growth, while a beginners mind offers many possibilities for rapid growth.

Augmented Intelligence will empower us with the best of both. In doing so, there is no reason to think that our own personal capabilities for intellectual advancement cannot equal or surpass the doubling per year that we see in computers. Yes, we will see the day when the augmented human expert will be able to get 2x smarter, every year.

Being a leader of people, I learned long ago that my own success is more defined by the augmented intelligence and capabilities that my team provides than anything I could solely do as an individual. The same will apply to the new performance enhancing co-workers that will augment our intelligence and capabilities. Through today’s eye, this picture of our future may be seen as heresy or a superhuman threat. That said, the same fear occurred in the past when it was suggested that all people could be given the power of reading.

Evolution is life. Embrace the future.

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RW Webinar: Rising demand for connectivity drives IoT advances in healthcare

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Doctor working with tablet computer.

The U.S. Census projects that between 2012 and 2050 the aging population will almost double. Baby boomers account for the majority of this growth and present a unique challenge to healthcare providers. Unlike their predecessors, Boomers want to “age in place” and expect to manage acute and chronic illness, accessing their healthcare providers virtually as well as via traditional in-person appointments.

By 2050, the population age 65 and older is projected to be 84 million, two times greater than 2012 estimates, says the U.S. Census

It’s not just Boomers who expect to address illness from the comfort of their living rooms.

Increasingly, consumer expectations of 24/7 access to care necessitate technological advances in healthcare. And monitoring and diagnostics technology are more than up to the challenge.

Healthcare regulations are changing to accommodate treatment outside of the four walls of the hospital and clinic. With access to the right technology, data, and expertise, field service workers can provide care at a lower cost than their on-site colleagues.

 

What about HIPAA?

A key component that must be integrated into any technology is data security that meets HIPAA requirements.

Tom Rose, Director of Business Development, IoT Solutions, at KOREbelieves the Internet of Things (IoT) brings smarter technology to bear on the unique challenges facing 21st Century healthcare. “IoT solutions support a customer-centric approach that cuts costs and scales according to need. Whether managing Help Desk inquiries or retrieving peripherals (such as insulin monitoring devices), solutions like KORE support smarter healthcare regardless of vertical.”

The rising demand for connectivity cannot function effectively in the old siloed system. An integrated smart-tech approach to the problem brings healthcare into the homes of those who need it. Furthermore, any technology must guarantee data security that meets HIPAA requirements.

“The future of healthcare is connected, integrated, and secure,” says Rose. “Whether putting tablets in the hands of patients, or improving health outcomes in the field, or tracking patient follow-through on post-operative instructions, IoT meets the increasing demand for connectivity.”

To find out how to leverage IoT technology to power healthcare connectivity, join ReadWrite and KORE for a free webinar.

During this free webinar, experts in the field of health IoT will discuss:

  • The benefits of IoT in healthcare
  • Example use cases demonstrating this innovation
  • How to implement  connected solutions to power innovation
  • How data flow between devices, to the cloud, and to enterprise systems can be achieved

Sign up for this 60-minute webinar today and gain valuable insights into building an effective IoT strategy within healthcare:

Our panelists:

  • Tom Rose,  Director of Business Development, IoT Solutions, KORE
  • Marie Finnegan, Principal Portfolio Marketing Specialist, Allscripts
  • Rachael Brownell, Webinar Manager, ReadWrite

The post RW Webinar: Rising demand for connectivity drives IoT advances in healthcare appeared first on ReadWrite.

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Cadillac previews Super Cruise at New York Auto Show

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cadillac-ct6-cruise-control

Cadillac previewed the next step in semi-autonomous technology at the New York Auto Show this week, improving its adaptive cruise control safety features.

The new Super Cruise system, which will be available in the Cadillac CT6 this fall, is able to alert the driver when they stop paying attention to the road and ensure that an accident similar to Tesla’s first autonomous fatality doesn’t happen in a Cadillac.

See Also: A quarter of all U.S. travel could be electric and driverless by 2030

Instead of packing the steering wheel with sensors to recognize when the driver has let go, Cadillac has added head tracking sensors to make sure the driver pays attention.

The ‘Driver Attention System’ will alert the driver if they look away for too long, and the system has a series of alerts that escalate the longer attention is diverted. These alerts include voice, noise alerts and haptic chair rumbles.

Ignore me and I’ll shut down

If a driver ignores all alerts, the car will turn hazard lights on and shut down. It will also alert the emergency services. Unlike other cruise control systems, the driver needs to only look back at the road to turn off the alerts, they do not need to hold the wheel.

Another addition to Cadillac’s Super Cruise is a geo-locator that ensures cruise control only works on divided, limited-access highways. It comes after the first fatal accident involving a Tesla’s Model S owner that had AutoPilot active last year. The Model S did not recognize the white van that had pulled out of an intersection and the driver was not paying attention to the road.

General Motors is one of the few major automakers that are committed to semi-autonomous tech inside of cars. Ford, its main U.S. rival, has said it will skip Level 3 autonomy, which is considered a slightly more advanced form of cruise control, to push straight for Level 5, the highest level of autonomous driving.

The post Cadillac previews Super Cruise at New York Auto Show appeared first on ReadWrite.

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How will maintenance change with the autonomous vehicle?

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Concept 26

All machines eventually break down. Self-driving vehicles are no exception.

Autonomous vehicles pose two problems for the future of vehicles. The removal of the driver means there is no person providing feedback on how the vehicle performs over time. You are removing the point-person who says “something feels wrong, this needs to be checked out.” An autonomous truck could easily arrive at its destination with one fewer wheels than it left with at its origin without recognizing there is a problem.

An autonomous truck could easily arrive at its destination with one fewer wheels than it left with at its origin without recognizing there is a problem.

See also: Automotive 2.0 – the new road ahead for autonomous vehicles

Autonomous vehicles also create a second maintenance problem – the sensor systems they use can fail. An autonomous vehicle operating with a faulty sensor is an on-the-road hazard. Imagine the wheel-speed sensor that reports the vehicle has stopped when it is actually traveling at highway speeds. A human would know to disregard that faulty input because it “feels” wrong. An autonomous vehicle could respond by continuously accelerating.

With the advent of autonomous vehicles, now, more than ever, systems need to be created for advanced diagnostics. AI should not just be used to make vehicles drive autonomously, but also to allow vehicles self-diagnose future and upcoming issues.

The new AI for maintenance

The concept of predicting breakdowns is nothing new. People have been using statistics for decades to calculate mean-time-to-failure – it is how the automotive industry came up with replacing parts based on number of miles driven. However, the ‘mean-time’ means that some parts repaired will have significant useful life yet and others will break before you get around to fixing them. AI allows something to be done that was unfeasible in the past – actively monitor every vehicle while it is in use.

Established companies have been working in this place for a while now. They operate on the notion that if you have been collecting data then they can put enough experts on the problem to create a solution. SAP, IBM, and Pivotal Labs are all making plays into the space. The problem is that they require that a company has been collecting data, knew what data to take, and knew to keep it.

As the industry matures and companies collect more data and gain large historical datasets, their solutions will be powerful. But nimble startups can use speed to their advantage in this situation by rapidly deploying a solution that will give them a permanent head start on collecting the sensor data needed to train the AI systems.

One such company is Uptake. They have had phenomenal growth, breaking a $1 billion dollar valuation within a year of incorporation and being named Forbes’ 2015 Hottest Startup. They did this by collecting a dataset from scratch, first with locomotives and then with other vehicles, through this they ended up with a partnership with Caterpillar. Their future looks to be diverging away from vehicles and towards bringing predictive maintenance to other industries.

Preteckt follows Uptakes footsteps in collecting its own dataset, but it targets the vehicles that are more commonly seen on the roads. Preteckt started with 18-wheelers and has already diversified into buses, and the hardware and software architecture that has been developed is portable to smaller vehicles. Preteckt’s technology has already been deployed in an autonomous truck and could be migrated to autonomous cars in the future.

The future is not “Star Trek”

Science fiction has people asking machines to run diagnostics to see if something is wrong, or what is wrong. The concept is flawed. The machines will know before you ask and will tell you what will go wrong with them next. They will tell you how to best take care of them to ensure that they do not fail on you. This is what you can look forward to with the autonomous vehicles of the future – a peace of mind in that your vehicle will not have any on-the-road surprises for you.

But why stop at eliminating surprises. Once vehicles can know their upcoming maintenance needs and drive themselves – why won’t they just take themselves to the mechanic when your schedule says you don’t need it. Maintenance will become an “out-of-sight, out-of-mind” concept making the ownership of a vehicle that much more enjoyable.

VB Profiles Connected Cars Landscape

VB Profiles Connected Cars Landscape

This article is part of our connected cars series. You can download a high-resolution version of the landscape featuring 250 companies here.

The post How will maintenance change with the autonomous vehicle? appeared first on ReadWrite.

Source: http://readwrite.com



How to avoid a massive smart city pitfall

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The Chicago Skyline is silhouetted aginst the setting sun.

As a technology executive, I’ve overseen the buildout of multiple data centers in my career. Without exception, all were designed with an uninterrupted power supply (UPS) and backup power.

In fact, I can’t imagine a data center of any consequence being built without these safeguards in place. No IT engineer worth his or her salt would consider it. Simply, the grid is not a sufficiently reliable foundation on which to rely for the ongoing operation of critical equipment.

Recognizing that, I ask you to think about the megatrend around smart city development. The current efforts around smart cities completely fail to address and incorporate resilience as a core strategy.

That is not smart.

We’re deploying “smart” cities such that they will fail our citizens and service providers the minute the grid goes down, when that information and capability is of critical importance and maximum need. Earthquake, bombing, super storm, tsunami, attack, hurricane, or rioting… That’s when we need guarantees that our city infrastructure will shine and support emergency response, empower “boots on the ground” and, of course, help our citizens.

When these scenarios arise, we’re in critical need of many services. Backup power. Communication network availability. Active information resources like public kiosks and intelligent lighting to direct people to safety. Data assets such as cameras and sensors to provide intelligence about local weather, the wind, water levels, flow rates, tilt, vibration, foot traffic and vehicle traffic. Systems to identify citizens in need. Security mechanisms to deter crime and damage to property.

Brian Lakamp, Founder & CEO, Totem

Brian Lakamp, Founder & CEO, Totem

This sort of resilience has, so far, been an afterthought in the smart city dialogue. We’ve been focused on incremental additions of new capability, without considering performance in adverse scenarios. That’s nuts.

The good news is that we’re in the process of rebuilding the grid around advanced energy like solar, wind and batteries. Some, like me, refer to that new network as the “Enernet.” As we build out the Enernet with energy storage to optimize the network and integrate renewables, we also have an opportunity to address resilience of critical services.

It would be a complete failure in our energy strategy if we were to overlook distributed batteries as part of the solution, and if we were to fail to deploy those assets as a resilient underpinning to smart city nodes and functionality.

Governments and utilities need to take a more active role on this front. Municipalities, states and public utility commissions (PUCs) need to demand resilience for strategic services. Utilities need to enable it. Smart city certification programs like that recently announced by Bloomberg need to evolve to incorporate resilience measurement.

Utilities need to embrace the future

Worth noting, the utilities shouldn’t do it only because their PUC requires it of them. Utilities who embrace the future have the opportunity to act as the backbone of the smart city, on which all other services reside. Paula-Gold Williams, CEO at CPS Energy understands the smart city opportunity.

It starts with imagining a future different from the historic, centralized “power plant” architecture to one where the network acts much more dynamically, like the communications network today, supporting new capabilities and services. The utilities that figure it out first and fastest stand to be the Verizon or Comcast of the Enernet.

Back to the matter at hand. To build a resilient smart city, the Enernet needs to be woven by utilities directly into the infrastructure, with deliberation. Fealty to foreseeable futures requires the Enernet be built as a resilient underpinning to modern municipal services. That is not yet happening today. And, that is not smart.

The author is the Founder/CEO of Totem Power, a startup transforming the future of distributed energy and smart cities. Previously, Brian worked for media giants including Sony and most recently iHeartMedia.

The post How to avoid a massive smart city pitfall appeared first on ReadWrite.

Source: http://readwrite.com



Microsoft unveils IoT Central to simplify Internet of Things development

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Microsoft unveils IoT Central to simplify Internet of Things development

Microsoft announced on Thursday a new “software-as-a-service” (SaaS) offering, called IoT Central, aimed at reducing the complexity of building Internet of Things solutions.

IoT Central allows developers to create software and hardware without cloud expertise, a necessity for large-scale IoT solutions in the past. Microsoft does not say exactly how the service reduces the need for cloud experience but said it will continue to update over the coming months.

See Also: The bot invasion is on, powered by $24B in funding

The new service is powered by Azure IoT Suite, Microsoft’s current central platform for IoT development. We assume for developers not accustomed to cloud computing, it will automate parts of the process.

“[IoT Central] has the potential to dramatically increase the speed at which manufacturers can innovate and bring new products to market, as well as lower the barriers to creating IoT solutions that generate new revenue opportunities and better experiences for customers,” said Microsoft.

Also updating Azure

Microsoft will also be updating Azure IoT Suite with a new “pre-configured solution”, called Connected Factory. The solution “makes it easy to connect on-premises open platform communications (OPC) UA and OPC Classic devices to the Microsoft cloud and get insights to help drive operational efficiencies.”

Connected Factory has built-in cloud security to make configuring devices in the cloud a safe experience. Microsoft has partnered with Unified Automation, Softing, and Hewlett-Packard Enterprise to build “turnkey gateway solutions” for the Connected Factory, using Azure cloud services.

Microsoft has made big investments in IoT and cloud over the past year and they appear to be paying off. Even though Amazon still controls most of the market-share for cloud computing, Azure is catching up.

Source: http://readwrite.com



How to become an omni-channel, data-driven retailer

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how to become

In today’s digital age where customers are as likely to buy a product from an e-commerce website as from a brick and mortar store, delivering a seamless and value-adding shopping experience has become more important than ever before. The multiple shopping channels available to customers and the competition posed by other retailers have made it an absolute necessity for a retail business to integrate data inputs from different channels and use to it define an omni-channel shopping experience.

See also: Is Amazon Go the sign of the downfall of the retail workforce?

As a Big Data and BI influencer, I have worked with a large number of businesses within and beyond the retail industry. Using this knowledge and expertise, I have developed a 5-step approach that businesses operating in the retail sector can adopt to meet the expectations of their customers and become an omni-channel, data-driven retailer.

Step 1: Collect the right type of customer data

In their journey to becoming a data-driven organization, businesses are required to collect the right type of data — data that can help them improve the customer experience and maximize the profit they gain from their online and offline channels.

For example, a business that operates brick and mortar stores would probably like to try different layouts and floor plans to determine which maximizes the chances of a sale. To do this, they will require sales breakdown for each store. On the other hand, since in online context you can personalize customer journeys, a business with an eCommerce website will be required to collect data about their purchasing history, browsing behaviors, and more.

Apart from customer data, competitor data is another type of data that you need to collect. Collect data regarding price, customer reviews and ratings, and sizing and use the intelligence gain to optimize your product catalogue and customer journey.

Gathering data without analyzing is not only a waste of time, it will also raise doubt and suspicion among your customers. Therefore, it is also important not to collect data that you are not going to use.

Step 2: Integrate your data sources

Once you have determined the type of data you want to collect, the next step is to identify the channels that can provide you the data. Retail businesses collect massive amounts of information from a wide range of channels. In fact, each successful transaction presents a data collection responsibility to retail businesses. However, the sheer amount of data and the disparate sources from which they are collected may make it quite an impossible task for businesses to organize the data and generate valuable insights from it.

Since a large amount of data collected by a retailer is processed through its Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) system, the platform can be used for the purpose of data organization. Alternatively, there are a number of other BI platforms available that businesses can use to improve their data collection, organization, visualization, and analytical capabilities. These platforms can collect data from a large number of sources, including:

  • Point-of-sale data
  • Customer feedback
  • Web Analytics data
  • Customer Relationship Management data
  • Supply chain data

omni

In our next webinar Ian Macdonald, Principal Technologist at Pyramid Analytics will show how a BI platform can help you amalgamate data and get a unified and accurate view of all your customer, competitor, and corporate data.

Step 3: Create a data-driven culture

Succeeding with data is not just a matter of investing in a BI solution or hiring a data analyst or scientist. Instead, it requires you to develop a data-driven culture that involves people from all the departments of the organization. This is particularly important for retail businesses because every single department of a retail business can add something significant to the data value chain.

omni2

For example, the finance department can help you determine if the prices are consistent across all channels or if there is a particular store or platform that’s not delivering the desired performance. Similarly, the people responsible for supply chain management can provide you information regarding supply chain issues and how they impact your order fulfillment capabilities. To summarize, from sales to marketing to HR and supplier relationship management, every single department of your organization can provide you answer to an important question. Therefore, establishing a data-driven culture and involving all the functions is imperative to become a data-driven omni-channel retailer.

Step 4: Do not be confined by reporting cycles

While automated pre-built reports offered by a BI and analytics solution can help you analyze data in a real-time manner in a more efficient manner, the routine reporting capabilities may also limit your ability to extract maximum value from your BI investment.

An ad-hoc analysis is a viable solution to this problem. It will allow your employees to adopt an innovative approach towards data analysis and get a deeper, more precise, and comprehensive view of your existing customers. Also, since Ad-hoc analysis solutions are built specifically for users, they ensure a high adoption rate. This, in turn, makes business intelligence accessible to every single person in your organization, allowing them to contribute to the data value chain in their own unique way.

Step 5: Look beyond your business

In order to become a true data-driven omni-channel enterprise, businesses should look beyond the data sources present within the organization. Consider the data sources located externally. The most common yet an important external data source is social media. Customers’ feedback about your business on various social media platforms can offer you a wealth of information, which you can use to optimize your customer journey.

Other unconventional external data sources that your business could benefit from include:

  • Search result data
  • Demographic information collected by different surveys
  • Online rankings of web pages and TV ads

Once you have collected information from all these channels, integrate it with your existing data and use a BI tool to identify trends and patterns and to predict customer behavior.

What have we learned?

From the evolution of e-commerce to the increasing use of social media and smartphones, the retail environment has gone through a multitude of changes over the past few years. This has led retailers to adopt an omni-channel approach that can enable customers to interact with and buy a product from a retailer at any time via any platform. However, in order to leverage the profit maximization potential of omni-channel strategy, businesses must utilize the data available to them in the right manner.

While the 5-step strategy mentioned above can help a business make progress towards their ultimate objective of becoming a data-driven, omni-channel enterprise, each and every business has its own unique needs, and therefore, a thorough evaluation of these needs and a customized approach to fulfill them is necessary.

image01 (1)

If you are interested in learning more multi-channel retail analytics, you can register for my upcoming webinar. You can also follow me on Twitter and LinkedIn to stay updated with the latest in BI and journey science.

The post How to become an omni-channel, data-driven retailer appeared first on ReadWrite.

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California parking garage operator prepares for self-driving revolution

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California parking garage operator prepares for self-driving revolution

Parking garages take up an enormous amount of space in retail zones and bring less value than a retail store, business block, or housing complex in the same area.

Sadly, in a world where almost everyone drives, they’re a necessity if a city or supermarket wants to avoid congestion and road accidents.

See Also: Taking a look at the future of next-generation transportation

It is no surprise then that AvalonBay Communities, a real-estate investment trust, is eager to see the introduction of self-driving cars.

The Virginia-based developer has already shown future plans for the two-floor underground parking garage, part of a residential complex under development in the Los Angeles Arts District, to the LA Times.

When it is finished in four years, the parking garage will still serve approximately 1,000 cars, but as people switch to ride-sharing vehicles, it will make way for shops, a gym, and a theater.

Not just AvalonBay

AvalonBay is not the only property developer eager rid the world of parking garages. Upscale shopping centre Grove has talked to Google about how to prepare for the future.

There is no definitive time when parking garages will become obsolete, but some analysts have projected 2020 to be the peak point for car ownership. After that, ride-sharing and shuttle solutions will start to rise.

Even though most automakers have not said it publicly, it sounds like self-driving cars will be for rental or ride-sharing services only, at least for the first few years. Ford’s head of research, Ken Washington, recently said customers will not be able to purchase self-driving cars until at least 2026.

Source: http://readwrite.com



Does Baidu want to be the Android of self-driving?

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baidu-car

Chinese search giant Baidu announced on Wednesday that it has open sourced its self-driving technology, through a new project named Apollo.

Automakers will be able to look at reference designs for self-driving sensors and use Baidu’s software, which includes a cloud data service to transmit 3D maps and traffic updates to the car.

See Also: Hackers tried to steal Chinese search giant’s autonomous trade secrets

The announcement a few months after Baidu ended a self-driving partnership with BMW, who then went on to partner with Intel and Mobileye.

Baidu has not said how it plans to finance the open source platform, but the addition of a cloud service sounds like one way. Automakers might also be forced to use Baidu as the default search engine, similar to how all Android manufacturers are forced to pre-install Google services.

Automakers will be able to download the platform come July, but it will only be for “restricted environment” driving. At the end of the year, the platform will open to self-driving programs on public roads.

Baidu is aiming for self-driving cars on public roads by 2020. It has been working on the technology for two years now.

“An open, innovative industry ecosystem initiated by Baidu will accelerate the development of autonomous driving in the US and other developed automotive markets,” said Baidu CEO, Qi Lu.

The move takes aim at Google, which has always made its services free to the public and operators. It may force the U.S. search giant to respond, especially if Google wants any chance of succeeding with the tech in China.

Google’s self-driving division, Waymo, has not said how it plans to commercialize its technology.

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Source: http://readwrite.com




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