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Buckwheat pillows offer a good night’s sleep without hurting the environment

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The benefits of switching from an off-gassing synthetic pillow to buckwheat are well-documented by now: The crunchy hulls of this pseudo-cereal are densely packed into a surprisingly heavy pillow that conforms to each new owner’s unique contours, providing the kind of sleep dreams are made of. Plus, the pillows last longer than their conventional cousins (with diligent care), and when the hulls do start to flatten out with time, it’s easy to replace them. But there’s more to buckwheat than comfort. Every part of this highly nutritional, fast-growing plant has something to offer, and it is typically cultivated without herbicides or pesticides, eliminating environmental harm.

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It’s no wonder buckwheat has such a long, illustrious history. According to the Whole Grains Council, “Buckwheat has been providing essential nutrients, vitamins, energy, and fiber to humanity for approximately 8,000 years. Its first starring role as a cultivated crop appears circa 4000 B.C. in the Balkan region of Europe, but its thought to have truly taken hold inland in Southeast Asia and from there spread to Central Asia, Tibet, the Middle East, and Europe.” They add that the Japanese emperor Gensho reportedly ordered the entire country to cultivate buckwheat in 722 to prepare for a protracted dry spell.

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Ideally suited to the kind of soil most plants would reject, this smother crop helps retain water in the soil, prevents erosion, and keeps weeds at bay, which in turn makes it less necessary to use pesticides. After the flowers yield buckwheat groats, the stalks can be transformed into straw for livestock, according to the Whole Grains Council, and the rest of the plant can be tilled for further water retention. Buckwheat also “likes” northern latitudes and high altitudes, hence its popularity in Russia, China and Kazakhstan. The hulls that go into pillows are simply the outer shell of the inner groat, which provides a slew of nutritional benefits for most people.

Related: Why a buckwheat pillow makes a good pillow

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The gluten free groats provide a rich source of protein, although the Whole Grain Council warns that digestibility may be low for some people. For others, according to Purdue University, “USDA-ARS analyses indicate that the grain has an amino acid composition nutritionally superior to all cereals, including oats. Buckwheat protein is particularly rich (6%) in the limiting amino acid lysine.” It is also rich in iron, zinc and selenium, reports New World Encyclopedia, as well as antioxidants.

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Given its multiple benefits, of which the above are just a few examples, it’s not hard to get behind a buckwheat pillow. And it really will provide superior sleep. According to Hullo, because buckwheat doesn’t collapse or “bottom out” like down or memory foam, their pillow provides excellent support (no more stiff neck). Also, in addition to being malleable, the pillow stays cool throughout the night since it doesn’t retain body heat.

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Still, the soft rustling sound, the weight and texture do take some getting used to, which is why Hullo offers a 60-day money back guarantee for their durable, breathable pillows made with a 100 percent organic cotton twill case filled with carefully-sourced buckwheat hulls. And if the filling isn’t just right, you can pour out some of the hulls until it is thanks to an elegant, zipped design.

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Hullo comes in three sizes, ranging in price from $59 to $149. And if that sounds steep, all you have to do is check out the glowing reviews people have left on the company’s website. Customer JP wrote, “My body feels so much better. My head feels so much better. I sleep through the night and I have energy in the morning. In short: I love, love, love this pillow.”

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+ Hullo Pillow

Images via Wikipedia, Mariluna, K.G.Kirailla, Vegan Baking, Andrey Korzun, Hullo Pillow

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Neanderthals, not homo sapiens, responsible for 64,000-year-old cave art

cave art, cave paintings, cave drawings, cave artwork

Researchers have discovered that Neanderthals, not homo sapiens, created a series of 64,000 year-old cave drawings in Spain. Published in the journal Science, this study marks the first time that Neanderthals have been credited as cave painters while declaring that the works of art themselves are the oldest known cave paintings. Utilizing advanced radioactive dating, the scientists determined that paintings made in three separate caves were far older than originally thought, indicating that the artwork was created 20,000 years before modern humans arrived in the area.

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The Neanderthal’s reputation as a bulkier, dumber kind of human seems to be misinformed. “It’s impossible to say that one is more clever than the other,” archaeology professor Marie Soressi told the Verge. An earlier theory speculated that Neanderthals only developed a culture after the arrival of modern humans in Europe between 40,000 to 50,000 years ago. The Neanderthal cave artwork proves that the species were creative and maintained their own culture and accompanying art. Neanderthals are also known to have used eagle claws and shells in their clothing as well as pigments to add color.

Related: Incredible fossil discovery rewrites the history of human migration out of Africa

Previous efforts to determine the age of cave art were complicated by dating technology limitations. The most common method works exclusively with organic matter; using uranium‘s radioactive decay as a metric requires a great deal of material to be dated, something that is not possible in rare, delicate discoveries like early human cave art. The scientists used a new method of dating in which they scrapped off only the crust of the cave painting, samples which are then dated in a laboratory.

Via The Verge

Images via D.L. Hoffman, C.D. Standish, et al.

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IKEA renewable electricity offer could save customers 300 per year

IKEA, Brent Park Wembley, London, United Kingdom, IKEA store, furniture store

IKEA is working for 100 percent renewable energy — producing as much as they consume by 2020 is their goal — and they want their customers to be able to live more sustainably too. They partnered with Big Clean Switch to help people switch to clean power. Using a collective switch model, they’re securing “an exclusive tariff on 100 percent renewable electricity” — which could save households more than £300 each year.

IKEA, Brent Park Wembley, London, United Kingdom, IKEA store, furniture store

IKEA aims to help people make the change to a renewable electricity provider. According to Big Clean Switch, renewable electricity tariffs work like this: “When you’re on a renewable electricity tariff, your supplier promises to match the amount of electricity you take out of the National Grid by ensuring the same amount of renewable electricity is put in. The more this happens, the greener the Grid should get.”

Related: IKEA plans to cut food waste in half by 2020 — here’s how

The deal is just for the United Kingdom — but if you live there, you could save hundreds of pounds on your electricity bill each year. Big Clean Switch said making the change is easy; they estimate it will take under five minutes, with no engineer visits necessary, and supply won’t be disrupted.

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IKEA UK sustainability manager Hege Sæbjørnsen said in a statement, “At IKEA, our commitment to sustainability goes beyond minimizing the impact of our own operations to having a positive impact on the world around us. We want to provide our customers with innovative solutions that will help them live a more sustainable life at home and save money in the short and long term.” IKEA UK started offering solar panels and battery storage for homes last year — we’d love to see the products in the United States!

If you live in the UK and want to sign up for the IKEA renewable electricity offer, you can express your interest here. Suppliers will compete to offer their best value tariff, and when the campaign goes live on March 6, IKEA and Big Clean Switch will get in touch with people who expressed interest to let them know the cost. The tariff will only be available from March 6 through March 26.

+ IKEA

+ Big Clean Switch

Images via Depositphotos and Karsten Würth on Unsplash

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Nissan to debut its self-driving taxis in Japan

Nissan, Easy Ride, Nissan Easy Ride, Nissan taxi

Nissan will begin testing its Easy Ride self-driving taxi service in Yokohama, Japan on March 5, 2018, with plans to launch the full service by the start of the 2020 Summer Olympics in Tokyo. In collaboration with Tokyo-based mobile app developer DeNA, Nissan will run the trial service on a 2.8 mile-route running from their headquarters to the Yokohama World Porters shopping center. While limited to start, the opening of Nissan’s Easy Ride service marks an significant step forward into the future of autonomous vehicles and urban transportation.

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The Easy Ride system is designed to incorporate user interests into its presentation, offering helpful information on points of interest, events, and shops. To build further ties between the self-driving taxi and local business, Easy Ride will offer coupons for recommended restaurants and businesses for users to exchange after they’ve departed their self-driving taxi. Easy Ride will also record feedback from users regarding their ride experience and their opinion on what a fair fare should be.

Related: Dubai tests the world’s first autonomous mobility pods

Nissan’s initial trial is planned to run for only a few weeks. However, the company plans to conduct further, more extensive tests. Recognizing the need to serve an Olympic-sized constituency as well as Japan’s aging population, the automaker plans to add more routes, implement a multi-lingual interface, and refine arrival and departure procedures over the next two years. To assuage any concerns regarding the safety of the self-driving taxis, Nissan will link each taxi to a remote monitoring center, where workers observe each ride and could take the wheel from afar if necessary.

Via Engadget

Images via Nissan and aotaro/Flickr

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The Air Opus pop-up camper inflates in 90 seconds flat

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The Air Opus Camper makes on-the-road living easy with an amazing self-inflating system that pops up in 90 seconds flat. Simply flick a switch and the camper automatically expands. When it’s time to leave, a quick-release valves deflate the camper in 30 seconds. The entire structure can be folded up and ready to go in under two minutes.

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The Air Opus Camper uses Air Pole Technology to make set up a snap. To inflate the camper, the two lids on top of the trailer need to be folded outwards. Once completely extended, there are just a few bed supports to snap into place. The final step is engaging the air pump, which inflates the camper in a minute and a half.

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Related: TAXA unveils ultra-lightweight Mantis camper with pop-up roof

The Air Opus camper, which retails at $21,499, offers an exceptionally comfortable interior with plenty sleeping and living space. The design improves upon previous models with more windows and skylights to let in natural light. As an extra bonus, the trailer is outfitted with a nifty pull out kitchen/grill for outdoor bbq-ing around the campfire.

+ Opus Campers

Via Uncrate

Images via Opus Campers

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Tesla-powered 1981 Honda Accord accelerates from 0 to 60 mph in 2.7 seconds

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Electric car conversions are popping up more and more as tinkerers put Tesla parts into other vehicles. Electrek recently shared an impressive example: the Teslonda, a 1981 Honda Accord converted by Jim Belosic of Reno, Nevada. He equipped the car with a Performance Large Tesla Drive Unit from HSR Motors and a Chevy Volt battery pack. The Teslonda’s body may be nearly 40 years old, but the modified car still accelerated from zero to 60 miles per hour in 2.7 seconds.

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If you see a 1981 Honda Accord rolling around the streets of Reno, it just might have a Tesla drive unit inside. Belosic, CEO of software company ShortStack who wrenches with cars as a hobby, told Inhabitat, “I’ve kept [the Honda Accord] around but I wasn’t driving it much…so I figured modernizing it with an electric drivetrain would be kinda fun. I haven’t worked with electric vehicle systems before, but I really think that is where the future is headed so I figured I should learn the technology. I’ve always been into modifying and hotrodding cars, so going electric is the next step.”

Related: Tesla-powered trolley spotted charging in Minnesota

Belosic shared a video of the Teslonda accelerating on YouTube, and said the 2.7 seconds milestone happened with “38 degree asphalt, cold tires, and a cold battery. I’m thinking 2.5 seconds is possible.”

Electric Gasser hahaha 🙂 #teslonda #gasser #hondaaccord #teslalife

A post shared by Jimmy Built (@jimmy.built) on Feb 15, 2018 at 8:50pm PST

Electrek said HSR Motors’ Performance Large Tesla Drive Unit offers a peak power output of 400 kilowatts. Jason Hughes, whom Electrek described as a prominent Tesla hacker, started HSR Motors after purchasing lots of Model X and Model S salvaged vehicles, repairing some and using components of others in projects such as a home energy storage system. He’s now selling Tesla drive units, battery modules, and a custom control system through HSR Motors.

Sorry I haven’t posted anything in a while. I’ve been busy with a new project: #teslonda. She’s a cross between a Tesla model S, a 60s #gasser and a 1981 Honda Accord. She’s extremely quick.

A post shared by Jimmy Built (@jimmy.built) on Feb 10, 2018 at 7:43pm PST

Belosic has also worked on a steam car and posted videos on YouTube. He told Inhabitat, “It’s fun to learn something new, just like the steam car last year. Next year maybe I’ll do something turbine-powered.” He shared more images of the Teslonda and his other projects on Instagram; you can check them out here.

+ Jimmy Built YouTube

+ Jimmy Built Instagram

Via Electrek

Images via Jimmy Built on YouTube

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This modern hiking hotel blends into the dark alpine forests of Italy

The darkened wood façade of the award-winning Hotel Bühelwirt is tinted to complement the moody, dark green of the surrounding forest. Pedevilla Architects designed the hotel as an extension of the breathtaking alpine landscape in South Tyrol, Italy. While designing the space, the architects sought to create harmony with the environment and give every room a breathtaking view of the landscape.

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The 20-room hotel references traditional hiking hotels of the region. Rectangular forms meet an asymmetrical saddle roof and feature diagonally protruding bay windows that offer expansive views of the mountains. Each room in the hotel features stunning views, strengthening the connection between guests and the surrounding landscape.

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Related: 17th-century farm transformed into amazing hotel in the hills of Norway

The minimalist interior features accents that add warmth and a feeling of coziness to the space, while creating focus on the outdoor environment. This is achieved through the use of locally sourced materials such as larch wood. Handcrafted copper lamps and locally manufactured curtains reflect a strong regional connection between the design of the hotel and its locale.

+ Pedevilla Architects

Via Dwell

Photos by Gustav Willeit

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New ‘category 6’ may be necessary to describe strengthening storms

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Do we need a category six in defining storms? Some climate scientists think so, as tropical cyclones increase in duration, intensity, and strength, The Guardian reported. Climatologist Michael Mann said, “Scientifically, [six] would be a better description of the strength of 200 miles per hour storms, and it would also better communicate the well-established finding now that climate change is making the strongest storms even stronger.”

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The Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale currently runs from one to five, based on sustained wind speed, according to the National Hurricane Center. Should we change the scale to include a six rating? Climate scientists at the Pacific Climate Change Conference in Wellington, New Zealand floated the idea, according to The Guardian.

Related: “We are not prepared” for climate change — scientists issue bleak warning

New Zealand climate change minister James Shaw said 2016’s Cyclone Winston could have been a category six storm if that rating existed. Winston, according to The Guardian, is the strongest cyclone we’ve recorded in the Southern Hemisphere. Shaw said at the conference, “The only reason it wasn’t a category six cyclone is because we don’t have a category six, but we might need one in the future.”

Cyclone Winston, Fiji, Tailevu, damage, destruction, structure

Mann said adding category six or reevaluating the scale could hold implications for how communities prepare for cyclones, and for how scientists understand changing cyclone behavior in the climate change era.

But not everyone is convinced we need a category six. Principal scientist Chris Brandolino at New Zealand’s National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research said meteorologists and the public are already familiar with the established scale, saying, “Categories are engaging to the public and it’s easy for us to understand and communicate the severity of a storm. I always encourage us reevaluating the science, we should always be asking, ‘Is what we are doing appropriate for the time?’ But I think if we are seriously to consider this it requires a holistic approach, looking at the whole scale, not just adding a category. Maybe the whole scale gets rejigged to reflect the times.”

Via The Guardian

Images via Wikimedia Commons (1,2)

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Gorgeous site-sensitive home ushers in the outdoors

In Northern California, a spectacular modern home embraces nature in more ways than one. Palo Alto-based Field Architecture designed the spacious residence, named Forty-One Oaks after the property’s oak trees that became the inspirational spark behind the design. The home was envisioned as an extension of the oak-studded landscape, an effect achieved through full-height glazing, a natural materials palette, and preservation of an on-site wildlife corridor through which deer, bobcats, and mountain lions traverse.

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Located in Portola Valley south of San Francisco, Forty-One Oaks comprises a series of rectilinear volumes built with great expanses of glass to blur the indoor-outdoor boundary, concrete walls that echo the verticality of tree trunks, and deep steel roof overhangs for solar shading. “41 Oaks produces an architecture that is in conversation with nature,” wrote the architects. “The house is centered around the idea of creating porosity, connecting with the forty-one oaks that dot the site. Instead of creating a massive block of living space, [we] created a series of pavilions that jut into the landscape.”

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Related: Solar-powered family retreat beautifully blends into California’s rolling hills

The contemporary interior is awash in natural light and the mostly neutral palette keeps attention on the outdoors. Forty-One Oaks’ best example of indoor-outdoor connection can be seen in the dining room, housed in a cantilevered window box with floor-to-ceiling views of the canopy for a treehouse-like feel. Outdoor terraces are reached through sliding glass doors from the main living space, while the master bedroom opens up to a Japanese rock garden.

+ Field Architecture

Via Dezeen

Exterior photography by Steve Goldband, interior photography by John Merkl

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Solar-powered home slides open to the Australian bush and ocean

This lovely family home isn’t just minimalist in appearance—it also emphasizes minimal landscape impact. Australian firm teeland architects designed Tinbeerwah House as a glass pavilion wrapped in sliding hardwood screens to give homeowners control over access to daylight, breezes, privacy, and views. The site-sensitive dwelling also harnesses solar energy for power, collects rainwater for potable use, and even recycles wastewater for irrigation and bush regeneration.

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Located in the Noosa hinterland, Tinbeerwah House features a rectangular footprint stretching north to south across 2,800 square feet. The architects chose a long and thin footprint to maximize access to ocean views and cross ventilation in every room. A spacious open-plan kitchen, dining, and living area occupy the north end of the home while the master bedroom en suite placed at south side bookends the three bedrooms, the bathrooms, and laundry room in the middle.

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Related: Renovated 1970s brick beach house in Australia gets new life with an elegant timber screen

Set atop black concrete retaining walls, the home’s low-lying timber-clad form blends into the landscape. Floor-to-ceiling glass blurs the boundary between inside and outside, and solar gain can be controlled with sliding screens. A small orchard and terraced vegetable garden are also on site.

+ teeland architects

Via ArchDaily

Images via teeland architects, © Jared Fowler

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