No Comment Diary

The News Without Comment

This content shows Simple View

Green

US CO2 emissions declined during Trump’s first year as president

Factory, chimney, emissions, smoke, pollution, environment

What were United States carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions like in 2017, the first year President Donald Trump was in office? Based on preliminary estimates, the Rhodium Group said US emissions declined by just below one percent, thanks to changes in the energy sector. Electrek crunched the numbers and found 94.7 percent of net new electricity capacity came from renewables. But emissions from buildings, industry, and transportation increased – and America has a ways to go to meet Paris Agreement goals.

Factory, chimney, emissions, smoke, pollution, environment

Nearly 80 percent of reduction in American energy-related CO2 emissions between 2005 and 2016 are thanks to the electric power sector, according to the Rhodium Group. They said in an article, “Improved efficiency of buildings and appliances has helped flatten electricity demand, and coal has lost market share to lower-carbon natural gas and zero-carbon renewables. That trend continued in 2017.”

Related: A ‘giant leap backward for humankind’ as CO2 emissions rise after years of stability

The group said coal lost ground to other power sources. Solar, wind, and hydropower generation growth displaced coal and natural gas. Between January and October generation from the two more-polluting fuels fell by 138 million kilowatt-hours (kWh) compared against the same period the year before – and renewable generation increased by 75 million kWh. But energy-related CO2 emissions increased in other sectors – “offsetting more than one-quarter of the gains made in electric power,” according to the Rhodium Group.

Renewable energy, clean energy, wind, wind power, wind energy, wind turbines

Even though Trump yanked America out of the Paris Accord, many states and cities said they’d stay in and work towards the United States’ goals. The Rhodium Group said, “Recent climate and clean energy policy developments at the state and city-level policy developments could potentially accelerate last year’s pace of emission reductions, while recent federal regulatory changes could slow that progress.”

They said America seems to be on track to reach the 2009 Copenhagen Accord goal of 17 percent reduction under 2005 levels by 2020, as long as the country keeps up the one percent energy-related CO2 emissions decline and there are no big changes in other emissions. The Paris Agreement pledge was 26 to 28 percent reduction from 2005 levels by 2025. America is not on track to achieve that – the country would need an average annual reduction of 1.7 to two percent in energy-related CO2 emissions over the upcoming eight years.

Via the Rhodium Group, Electrek, and Engadget

Images via Depositphotos and Thomas Richter on Unsplash

http://ift.tt/2DkZU1H Source: https://inhabitat.com



We recycle so much trash, it’s created an international crisis

original video: https://youtu.be/lH4WpBbX0oE

You may have heard the delicate whispers on the wind: “China doesn’t want to take our recycling anymore.” And you ignored those whispers, because you didn’t know China took our recycling in the first place, and there’s no way this has anything to do with your life! Right?

Oh, dear. As a nation, we’ve been passing on too many low-quality recyclables to other countries — China, primarily — to get them to deal with it. Watch our video above to find out what has to change.

This story was originally published by Grist with the headline We recycle so much trash, it’s created an international crisis on Jan 16, 2018.

http://ift.tt/2FGcg2G Source: http://grist.org



This highly insulated modular home is completely self-sustaining

Going off grid isn’t just for solo meditative retreats—nowadays you can comfortably bring the whole family along. Australian firm Modscape recently completed their latest custom modular build called Franklinford, an off-grid residence in Victoria, Australia. Shared between two families, this four-bedroom home is completely self-sustaining with its own solar system and 80,000-liter water tank.

Franklinford Victoria, Franklinford residence, Franklinford by Modscape, Colorbond clad architecture, SIPs modular construction, Australian off grid housing, off grid architecture in Victoria, off grid family housing, off grid family retreat

Franklinford Victoria, Franklinford residence, Franklinford by Modscape, Colorbond clad architecture, SIPs modular construction, Australian off grid housing, off grid architecture in Victoria, off grid family housing, off grid family retreat

Set in an open farmland in Victoria’s Central Highlands, Franklinford takes design cues from nearby agricultural buildings with its no-nonsense metal and timber palette. Its east-facing facade seen from the approach is faced with radially sawn timber board-and-battern siding. Durable Colorbond steel clads the rest of the exterior that’s accented with Vitrabond aluminum. Oriented to capture winter sun, the low-lying rural retreat’s highly insulated shell is constructed from SIPs and thermally broken, low-e glazing to minimize temperature fluctuations.

Franklinford Victoria, Franklinford residence, Franklinford by Modscape, Colorbond clad architecture, SIPs modular construction, Australian off grid housing, off grid architecture in Victoria, off grid family housing, off grid family retreat

Franklinford Victoria, Franklinford residence, Franklinford by Modscape, Colorbond clad architecture, SIPs modular construction, Australian off grid housing, off grid architecture in Victoria, off grid family housing, off grid family retreat

Related: Solar-Powered Modular Cabin Exists Completely Off-the-Grid in Australia

The interior features whitewashed walls set against dark oak timber floors for a clean and minimalist effect. A large living wing forms the home’s focal point and is wrapped in floor-to-ceiling glazing that opens up to a north-facing L-shaped timber deck. The communal area leads to the four bedrooms via a long hallway. A nearby metal-clad shed houses the solar system and a large 80,000-liter water tank.

+ Modscape

Images by John Madden

Franklinford Victoria, Franklinford residence, Franklinford by Modscape, Colorbond clad architecture, SIPs modular construction, Australian off grid housing, off grid architecture in Victoria, off grid family housing, off grid family retreat

Franklinford Victoria, Franklinford residence, Franklinford by Modscape, Colorbond clad architecture, SIPs modular construction, Australian off grid housing, off grid architecture in Victoria, off grid family housing, off grid family retreat

Franklinford Victoria, Franklinford residence, Franklinford by Modscape, Colorbond clad architecture, SIPs modular construction, Australian off grid housing, off grid architecture in Victoria, off grid family housing, off grid family retreat

http://ift.tt/2mCAkeh Source: https://inhabitat.com



Heritage-listed church repurposed into modern solar-powered home in Brisbane

Brisbane-based architecture studio DAHA merged old and new with the Church House, an eye-catching modern home and adaptive reuse project. The unusual combination attaches a sleek structure of concrete, steel, and glass to a brick church, known as the Church of Figuration that was built in 1924. While the church’s position wasn’t moved, the architects carefully positioned the new-build based on climatic site conditions and to optimize passive heating and cooling and conditions for a photovoltaic solar array and water harvesting.

Church House by DAHA, Church House by Georgia Cannon, Church House Brisbane, adaptive reuse church house, church repurposed housing, solar powered architecture Brisbane, Church of Transfiguration Brisbane, Georgia Cannon interior design, DAHA architecture

Church House by DAHA, Church House by Georgia Cannon, Church House Brisbane, adaptive reuse church house, church repurposed housing, solar powered architecture Brisbane, Church of Transfiguration Brisbane, Georgia Cannon interior design, DAHA architecture

The Church of Figuration was originally purchased as part of a $2.4million AUD hillside property in Norman Park, the sale came with the condition that the heritage-listed Church of Transfiguration be preserved. Thus, the architects kept the church as the property’s focal point by retaining sight lines: the heritage building is flanked by a tennis court on one side and a manicured lawn and landscape on the other. The elevated site provides sweeping views of the neighborhood.

Church House by DAHA, Church House by Georgia Cannon, Church House Brisbane, adaptive reuse church house, church repurposed housing, solar powered architecture Brisbane, Church of Transfiguration Brisbane, Georgia Cannon interior design, DAHA architecture

Church House by DAHA, Church House by Georgia Cannon, Church House Brisbane, adaptive reuse church house, church repurposed housing, solar powered architecture Brisbane, Church of Transfiguration Brisbane, Georgia Cannon interior design, DAHA architecture

Related: Old converted church hides gorgeous modern interiors in London

“The Church House extension is a sympathetic adaptation of an existing heritage church into a unique family home,” wrote the architects, who connected the church and extension with a dark zinc tunnel. “The extension responds to the grand scale and form of the existing church through robust materiality and formal gestures, creating balance between the old and the new.” Although the church’s facade has been kept intact, the interior character was changed to serve as the family’s entertainment room with a mezzanine-level home office. The extension houses three bedrooms and bathrooms. Interior designer Georgia Cannon carried out the minimalist aesthetic of cool-toned concrete, dark timber, steel, and glass.

+ DAHA

Via ArchDaily

Photos © Cathy Schusler

Church House by DAHA, Church House by Georgia Cannon, Church House Brisbane, adaptive reuse church house, church repurposed housing, solar powered architecture Brisbane, Church of Transfiguration Brisbane, Georgia Cannon interior design, DAHA architecture

Church House by DAHA, Church House by Georgia Cannon, Church House Brisbane, adaptive reuse church house, church repurposed housing, solar powered architecture Brisbane, Church of Transfiguration Brisbane, Georgia Cannon interior design, DAHA architecture

Church House by DAHA, Church House by Georgia Cannon, Church House Brisbane, adaptive reuse church house, church repurposed housing, solar powered architecture Brisbane, Church of Transfiguration Brisbane, Georgia Cannon interior design, DAHA architecture

http://ift.tt/2DFaxu9 Source: https://inhabitat.com



Idyllic ecolodge tucked into remote Vietnamese mountainside is made of locally-sourced granite

Located in a remote region in northern Vietnam, the Topas Ecolodge could just be the ultimate off-grid getaway. Set in an idyllic location with stunning views of the lush green mountainside, the sustainable complex offers 33 one-bedroom bungalows constructed from local white granite quarried from the surrounding mountains.

The lodge is located in the remote village of Sapa in northern Vietnam, deep in the Hoang Lien Son mountain range. The area is quite popular for tourism and many people come to visit the traditional hill tribe villages found in the area. In the past, visitors to the region would stay in the villages, but as tourism grew, the area was in dire need of a sustainable lodging option that would not take away from the idyllic surroundings.

Related: Bolivia’s Ecolodge del Lago takes inspiration from traditional Lak’a Uta architecture

Topas Ecolodge, Hoang Lien National Park, Vietnam ecolodge, ecolodges around the world, ecolodge design, sustainable design, green design, green ecolodge, North Vietnam ecolodge, off grid lodges, unique ecolodges, locally sourced materials, ecohotels, eco huts, green travel, sustainable lodging,

The Topas Ecolodge was designed to provide rustic, but comfortable lodging that blends into the landscape. Situated atop two cone formed hills, the project’s construction was based on sustainable principles in order to create as low impact on the environment as possible.

Topas Ecolodge, Hoang Lien National Park, Vietnam ecolodge, ecolodges around the world, ecolodge design, sustainable design, green design, green ecolodge, North Vietnam ecolodge, off grid lodges, unique ecolodges, locally sourced materials, ecohotels, eco huts, green travel, sustainable lodging,The 33 one-bedroom bungalows were all made out of locally-sourced granite quarried from the nearby mountains. Additionally, the complex has an innovative wastewater facility that was designed to avoid pollution of the surroundings. Additionally, the goods and products used in the lodge are all found locally.

Topas Ecolodge, Hoang Lien National Park, Vietnam ecolodge, ecolodges around the world, ecolodge design, sustainable design, green design, green ecolodge, North Vietnam ecolodge, off grid lodges, unique ecolodges, locally sourced materials, ecohotels, eco huts, green travel, sustainable lodging,

Created as a wellness retreat, thee bungalows have no TV and no internet. Visitors can spend their time hiking or biking through the mountainside and when they’re ready for a bit of relaxation, the infinity pool offers breathtaking views of the mountainside. Additionally, there is an onsite spa that specializes in the traditional Red Dao herbal bath.

+ Topas Ecolodge

Via Uncrate

Topas Ecolodge, Hoang Lien National Park, Vietnam ecolodge, ecolodges around the world, ecolodge design, sustainable design, green design, green ecolodge, North Vietnam ecolodge, off grid lodges, unique ecolodges, locally sourced materials, ecohotels, eco huts, green travel, sustainable lodging,

Topas Ecolodge, Hoang Lien National Park, Vietnam ecolodge, ecolodges around the world, ecolodge design, sustainable design, green design, green ecolodge, North Vietnam ecolodge, off grid lodges, unique ecolodges, locally sourced materials, ecohotels, eco huts, green travel, sustainable lodging,

Topas Ecolodge, Hoang Lien National Park, Vietnam ecolodge, ecolodges around the world, ecolodge design, sustainable design, green design, green ecolodge, North Vietnam ecolodge, off grid lodges, unique ecolodges, locally sourced materials, ecohotels, eco huts, green travel, sustainable lodging,

Topas Ecolodge, Hoang Lien National Park, Vietnam ecolodge, ecolodges around the world, ecolodge design, sustainable design, green design, green ecolodge, North Vietnam ecolodge, off grid lodges, unique ecolodges, locally sourced materials, ecohotels, eco huts, green travel, sustainable lodging,

Topas Ecolodge, Hoang Lien National Park, Vietnam ecolodge, ecolodges around the world, ecolodge design, sustainable design, green design, green ecolodge, North Vietnam ecolodge, off grid lodges, unique ecolodges, locally sourced materials, ecohotels, eco huts, green travel, sustainable lodging,

http://ift.tt/2mF5wu6 Source: https://inhabitat.com



New satellite paves the way for full-color, full-motion video from space

CARBONITE-2, Surrey Satellite Technology Limited, satellite, satellite prototype, technology, satellite technology

British company Earth-i just launched a new prototype satellite that paves the way for the “world’s first full-color, full-motion video satellite constellation.” CARBONITE-2 is a test version of the the Vivid-i commercial satellite constellation, and its imaging system “is designed to deliver 1m resolution images and color HD video clips with a swath width of 5km.”

CARBONITE-2, Surrey Satellite Technology Limited, satellite, satellite prototype, technology, satellite technology

CARBONITE-2 (which the Earth-i team calls VividX2) blasted off from the Indian Space Research Organization‘s Satash Dhawan Space Center aboard the Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle late last week. Surrey Satellite Technology Limited (SSTL) manufactured the technology demonstration satellite. In their statement on the launch they said it “will demonstrate a low-cost video-from-orbit solution using Commercial-Off-The-Shelf technologies.”

Related: Teen creates world’s lightest satellite and NASA is sending it to space

An Ultra High Definition camera on CARBONITE-2 can snap high-resolution images and capture up to two minutes of video. The satellite weighs around 220 pounds, and it will orbit 314 miles, above the planet, moving at around 4.3 miles a second.

CARBONITE-2, Surrey Satellite Technology Limited, team, scientists, engineers, satellite, satellite technology, technology

European Space Agency Earth Observation Programs director Josef Aschbacher said in a statement, “The launch of VividX2 is a significant next development of Earth-i’s constellation, and welcomed by ESA. The Vivid-i Constellation will provide capabilities we haven’t seen before including full-color video, and an assured stream of high-quality data from space to help improve both our planet and lives on Earth.”

The company said such images and videos could help governments or businesses monitor assets, track activities or changes, and even “predict future events with more certainty.” Earth-i has already ordered the next five satellites for Vivid-i from SSTL.

Via Engadget, Earth-i, and Surrey Satellite Technology Limited

Images via SSTL/Beaucroft Photography

http://ift.tt/2D8FC8j Source: https://inhabitat.com



The organic farm teaching sustainable growing techniques in Canada’s cold, dark north

Northern Farm Traning Institute, Northwest Territories Canada, Canada, Canada farming, Canada agriculture, Northwest Territories farming, Northwest territories agriculture, holistic agriculture, northern farming, northern latitude farming, cold farming, holistic agriculture, food security, farming food security, food self sufficiency

Tucked inside the lush boreal forest in Canada’s Northwest Territories, you’ll find something unexpected. There, cheek to jowl with the ever-encroaching trees sits a thriving farm with snuffling pigs, lush fruit trees, and acres of vegetables, all in an environment that is anything but hospitable to agriculture. But creating a flourishing, regenerative landscape perfect for establishing local food security is exactly what the Northern Farm Training Institute is all about. Their goal is to help people form their own holistic growing environments to support healthy, food-secure communities – even if they happen to be located above the 60th parallel.

 Northern Farm Traning Institute, Northwest Territories Canada, Canada, Canada farming, Canada agriculture, Northwest Territories farming, Northwest territories agriculture, holistic agriculture, northern farming, northern latitude farming, cold farming, holistic agriculture, food security, farming food security, food self sufficiency

The Northern Farm Training Institute (NFTI) was founded in 2013 as a way to train people in isolated communities how to grow their own food and to restore northern environment-based food systems. Since then, the farm has taught 147 people from over 30 communities – half of those from First Nations/Metis/Inuvialuit communities – to create their own farms.

Northern Farm Traning Institute, Northwest Territories Canada, Canada, Canada farming, Canada agriculture, Northwest Territories farming, Northwest territories agriculture, holistic agriculture, northern farming, northern latitude farming, cold farming, holistic agriculture, food security, farming food security, food self sufficiency

NFTI grew as Jackie Milke, a local Hay River Metis woman, recognized the need to alleviate food insecurity in local communities. She quickly realized that there was a large demand for this type of learning, and the 260-acre farm has since hosted 30 intensive workshops in what they call a “living classroom.”

Northern Farm Traning Institute, Northwest Territories Canada, Canada, Canada farming, Canada agriculture, Northwest Territories farming, Northwest territories agriculture, holistic agriculture, northern farming, northern latitude farming, cold farming, holistic agriculture, food security, farming food security, food self sufficiency

The farm consists of outdoor gardens, a hoop greenhouse, and a geodesic dome greenhouse. On the farm live herds of sheep, cattle, pigs, goats, and chickens, with an animal barn, industrial kitchen and farm store. There are also 10 small yurts that act as student housing, and one large yurt for classroom learning. All of this is surrounded by the nearby Hay River, fields, forests and ponds.

Related: Utopian off-grid Regen Village produces all of its own food and energy

Northern Farm Traning Institute, Northwest Territories Canada, Canada, Canada farming, Canada agriculture, Northwest Territories farming, Northwest territories agriculture, holistic agriculture, northern farming, northern latitude farming, cold farming, holistic agriculture, food security, farming food security, food self sufficiency

Farming in the NFTI focuses on regenerative, holistically-grown food that improves the health of the land and wildlife. The farm is completely organic and uses tactics like minimal tillage, and supporting biodiversity and soil health to help maintain a healthy environment. The farm grows a variety of berries, cherries, herbs, greens, carrots, beets, beans, potatoes, radishes and cruciferous vegetables.

Northern Farm Traning Institute, Northwest Territories Canada, Canada, Canada farming, Canada agriculture, Northwest Territories farming, Northwest territories agriculture, holistic agriculture, northern farming, northern latitude farming, cold farming, holistic agriculture, food security, farming food security, food self sufficiency

To further support a healthy community, NFTI uses produce that is being thrown out by local grocery stores to feed their pigs. In the fall, they teach wool washing, felting and dying. Pigs are used to help clear land for farming, and sheep help weed and fertilize pasture areas. They also work with animals that are more comfortable in colder climates, like Iceland Sheep and yaks, rather than the Rambouillet sheep and Angus cattle so familiar in the US.

Northern Farm Traning Institute, Northwest Territories Canada, Canada, Canada farming, Canada agriculture, Northwest Territories farming, Northwest territories agriculture, holistic agriculture, northern farming, northern latitude farming, cold farming, holistic agriculture, food security, farming food security, food self sufficiency

During the winter, with just six daylight hours, aurora borealis overhead and a sunset at 3:45 pm, the Northern Farm Training Institute doesn’t sit back and take January off. They grow seedlings inside their greenhouses, using snow to water the plants. The sunlight bouncing off the snow outside creates an ideal lighting effect for the growing plants. And the farm collects and uses discarded shredded paper from local communities to keep the animals warm. They also teach cheesemaking classes and food storage classes.

Northern Farm Traning Institute, Northwest Territories Canada, Canada, Canada farming, Canada agriculture, Northwest Territories farming, Northwest territories agriculture, holistic agriculture, northern farming, northern latitude farming, cold farming, holistic agriculture, food security, farming food security, food self sufficiency

The farm’s goal can be summed up as this: “Together we can transform Canada’s north. Regenerative agriculture provides the key to our food security, economic growth, and environmental restoration.” If you’d like to check the farm out, you can stop on by, either as a visitor, student or volunteer. Head to their webpage for more information.

+ Northern Farm Training Institute

images via NFTI

Northern Farm Traning Institute, Northwest Territories Canada, Canada, Canada farming, Canada agriculture, Northwest Territories farming, Northwest territories agriculture, holistic agriculture, northern farming, northern latitude farming, cold farming, holistic agriculture, food security, farming food security, food self sufficiency

http://ift.tt/2D3MDHp Source: https://inhabitat.com



Massive underwater volcanic eruption spewed rock raft visible from space

Havre Caldera, Havre Volcano, underwater, underwater volcano, volcanic eruption, caldera

Passengers on a plane flight in 2012 saw something strange from the air: a raft of floating rock called pumice that grew to be roughly the size of Philadelphia, over 150 square miles, in the southwest Pacific Ocean. The raft hinted at an unusually large underwater volcanic eruption. In 2015, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) and the University of Tasmania led an investigation to collect materials and map the volcano – and they found some surprises.

Havre Caldera, Havre Volcano, underwater, underwater volcano, volcanic eruption, caldera

Over 70 percent of volcanic activity on our planet happens on the seafloor, but scientists don’t always get a close-up view of events typically hidden by seawater. In 2012, the Havre volcano, northeast of New Zealand, erupted – and this time researchers got a chance to study the aftermath in what the WHOI described as “the first up-close investigation of the largest underwater volcanic eruption of the past century.” The eruption was so massive it generated a raft of pumice that could be glimpsed from space.

Related: Underwater Volcanic Eruption Creates a New Island in the Pacific Ocean

WHOI scientist Adam Soule said in the institution’s statement, “Heading to the site, we were fully prepared to investigate a typical deep-sea explosive eruption. When we looked at the detailed maps from the AUV [autonomous underwater vehicle], we saw all these bumps on the seafloor and I thought the vehicle’s sonar was acting up. It turned out that each bump was a giant block of pumice, some of them the size of a van. I had never seen anything like it on the seafloor.”

Havre Volcano, remotely operated vehicle, Jason, seafloor, heat flow monitor, underwater volcano

Lava came from 14 volcanic vent sites 3,000 to 4,000 feet below the surface in the eruption. Scientists had thought the explosion would generate mostly pumice, but also found ash, lava domes, and seafloor lava flows, per WHOI. Soule said, “Ultimately we believe that none of the magma was erupted in the ways we assume an explosive eruption occurs on land.” According to WHOI’s video, such research could help us better understand the planet’s evolution.

Havre Volcano, map, New Zealand, Australia, Pacific Ocean, underwater volcano, volcano

The journal Scientific Advances published the research last week. 20 scientists at institutions in Australia, the United States, New Zealand, and Japan collaborated on the work.

Via the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Images via Rebecca Carey, University of Tasmania, Adam Soule, WHOI, © Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution; Multidisciplinary Instrumentation in Support of Oceanography (MISO) Facility, © Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution; and the Sentry Group, WHOI

http://ift.tt/2mzyWc8 Source: https://inhabitat.com



Specially structured bird of paradise feathers function like a “black hole”

bird of paradise, birds of paradise, bird of paradise mating, bird of paradise black feathers

Scientists have discovered that bird of paradise feathers are physically structured in such a way as to absorb nearly all light that reaches them, much like a black hole. Viewers of the acclaimed nature documentary series Planet Earth may recall the bird of paradise from its featured segment, in which male members of the species display their pitch-black feathers, punctuated with spots of vibrant color, while they dance in hopes of attracting a mate. These feathers are not simply a darker shade of black. In fact, their physical structure enables a level of near-total light absorption that is rare in the animal kingdom.

Optical measurements of the bird of paradise feathers indicate that they are capable of absorbing 99.95% of light that reaches it, a similar level of light absorption to man-made ultra-black materials such as the lining of telescopes. “Evolution sometimes ends up with the same solutions as humans,” said senior author and Yale professor Rick Prum, according to Phys.org. The super-black feathers, coupled with patches of bright color, function as an evolved optical illusion. “An apple looks red to us whether it is sitting in the bright sunlight or in the shade because all vertebrate eyes and brains have special wiring to adjust their perception of the world according to ambient light,” said co-lead author Dakota “Cody” McCoy. “Birds of paradise, with their super-black plumage, increase the brilliance of adjacent colors to our eyes, just as we perceive the red even though the apple is in the shade.”

Related: Birds that escape from captivity teach wild birds how to speak (and swear) in English

bird of paradise feathers, birds of paradise feathers, bird of paradise feather

The difference between regular feathers and super-black feathers is found in the structure of the main stem and barbs in the feather. Where regular feather has single barbs attached to the main stem, super-black feathers have many spines that serve to create a dense thicket of feathers. “When you have no flat surfaces, the light gets completely absorbed by the feather,” said McCoy, according to Gizmodo. While these feathers are unusually effective at absorbing light, the light-absorption effect is most strong when seen from directly ahead. Still, the biologically developed super-blackness may offer lessons to engineering humans. “Sexual selection has produced some of the most remarkable traits in nature,” Prum said, according to Phys.org. “Hopefully, engineers can use what the bird of paradise teaches us to improve our own human technologies as well.”

Via Gizmodo and Phys.org

Images via Ed Shoales/Birds-of-Paradise Project and Yale University

http://ift.tt/2DAdoo1 Source: https://inhabitat.com



Frank Lloyd Wrights final house hits the market for $3.25 million

Frank Lloyd Wright, Norman Lykes House, Phoenix, John Rattenbury, Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation, Talien West, panoramic views, green architecture, modernist architecture, wood interior

Frank Lloyd Wright’s final project, the Norman Lykes House, is back on the market for $3.25 million after failing to secure a buyer at a higher price. The residence, built into the side of a mountain in Phoenix, Arizona, offers stunning views of the city and includes some of Wright’s most celebrated design trademarks.

Frank Lloyd Wright, Norman Lykes House, Phoenix, John Rattenbury, Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation, Talien West, panoramic views, green architecture, modernist architecture, wood interior

The famous architect designed the house just before his death in 1959. His apprentice, John Rattenbury, was appointed the architect for the home following Wright’s passing and was hired by the current owners to update the property in 1994. Rattenbury converted the five-bedroom home into a three bedroom, three bath space with the approval by Taliesin West.

Frank Lloyd Wright, Norman Lykes House, Phoenix, John Rattenbury, Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation, Talien West, panoramic views, green architecture, modernist architecture, wood interior

Related: Frank Lloyd Wright’s mushroom-esque Usonia home hits the market for $1.5M

The design of the house is based on circular geometry, with rounded windows and walls. Its curves follow the topography of the rocky backdrop, while the main living area offers expansive views of Phoenix. The home will be listed via The Agency shortly.

Via Apartment Therapy

Photos via Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation

Frank Lloyd Wright, Norman Lykes House, Phoenix, John Rattenbury, Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation, Talien West, panoramic views, green architecture, modernist architecture, wood interior

Frank Lloyd Wright, Norman Lykes House, Phoenix, John Rattenbury, Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation, Talien West, panoramic views, green architecture, modernist architecture, wood interior

Frank Lloyd Wright, Norman Lykes House, Phoenix, John Rattenbury, Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation, Talien West, panoramic views, green architecture, modernist architecture, wood interior

Frank Lloyd Wright, Norman Lykes House, Phoenix, John Rattenbury, Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation, Talien West, panoramic views, green architecture, modernist architecture, wood interior

http://ift.tt/2D6qrwe Source: https://inhabitat.com




top