No Comment Diary

The News Without Comment

This content shows Simple View

Green

Geologists discover fossils from 13 ancient tree species in Antarctica

Antarctica, Transantarctic Mountains, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Erik Gulbranson, tree, trees, forest, forests, environment, land, fossil, fossils, fossil fragments, fossil fragment

It may be hard to believe, but forests once sprawled across Antarctica. University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee (UWM) geologists recently climbed the slopes of McIntyre Promontory in the Transantarctic Mountains to uncover fossil fragments from 13 trees that greened Antarctica more than 260 million years ago – before the first dinosaurs roamed the planet.

Antarctica, Transantarctic Mountains, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Erik Gulbranson, tree, trees, forest, forests, environment, land, fossil, fossils, fossil fragments, fossil fragment

Geologists Erik Gulbranson and John Isbell ventured to Antarctica for evidence of the trees that once flourished there. The fossils they discovered are over 260 million years old, meaning forests thrived around the close of the Permian Period, which ended in Earth’s largest mass extinction. The planet shifted from icehouse to greenhouse conditions, according to UWM, and over 90 percent of species vanished – including Antarctic trees.

Related: Scientists discover nearly 100 unknown volcanoes – in Antarctica

Gulbranson thinks the Antarctic forest trees were a hearty species, and is working to figure out why they went extinct. He said in a statement, “This forest is a glimpse of life before the extinction, which can help us understand what caused the event.”

Antarctica, Transantarctic Mountains, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Erik Gulbranson, tree, trees, forest, forests, environment, land, fossil, fossils, fossil fragments, fossil fragment

In the last days of the Permian Period, Antarctica was part of Gondwana, and was warmer and more humid than today. Gulbranson said the Antarctic forests would have been different from what we think of when we hear the word forest today. Permian Era forests contained a “potentially low diversity assemblage of different plant types with specific functions that affected how the entire forest responded to environmental change,” according to UWM. The university described the forests as robust – but even they were no match for high carbon dioxide concentrations during the mass extinction.

Gulbranson is returning to Antarctica, and aims to discern how the forests reacted to increasing amounts of carbon dioxide, saying, “The geologic record shows us the beginning, middle, and end of climate change events. With further study, we can better understand how greenhouse gases and climate change affect life on Earth.”

Via University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Images via Christopher Michel on Flickr and UWM Photo/Troye Fox

http://ift.tt/2A4vJaT Source: https://inhabitat.com



Lookout Loop bird observatory in Latvia doubles as a temporary shelter

Lookout Loop, bird watching, observatory, Ulf Mejergren Architects, Latvia, nature park, wooden structure, temporary shelter, shelter, green architecture, Siberian larch

Ulf Mejergren Architects just unveiled plans for a beautiful bird observatory in Latvia that doubles as a temporary shelter. The Lookout Loop has a sinuous, sculptural form that allows visitors to enjoy expansive views of the wetlands and rest before continuing on one of the paths through Pape Nature Park.

Lookout Loop, bird watching, observatory, Ulf Mejergren Architects, Latvia, nature park, wooden structure, temporary shelter, shelter, green architecture, Siberian larch

The observatory rises from the ground like a dock, with three pairs of curved stair sections joining in a loop, leaving a void in the center. The stairs gets wider closer to the top and the upper landing serves as an observation deck on each pair of stairs. Covered spaces for shelter are located on both sides of the entrance.

Lookout Loop, bird watching, observatory, Ulf Mejergren Architects, Latvia, nature park, wooden structure, temporary shelter, shelter, green architecture, Siberian larch

Related: X-Studio’s Lightweave Palm Observatory is Made Entirely From Palm Leaves

The entire structure is made of rot-resistant Siberian larch heartwood. Small gaps between the planks were left in order to allow the wood to dry properly. This also creates a nice visual effect– light filters through the gaps and create the impression of permeability. The main structure is composed of poles interlocked with a treated wood truss-system.

+ Ulf Mejergren Architects

Lookout Loop, bird watching, observatory, Ulf Mejergren Architects, Latvia, nature park, wooden structure, temporary shelter, shelter, green architecture, Siberian larch

Lookout Loop, bird watching, observatory, Ulf Mejergren Architects, Latvia, nature park, wooden structure, temporary shelter, shelter, green architecture, Siberian larch

Lookout Loop, bird watching, observatory, Ulf Mejergren Architects, Latvia, nature park, wooden structure, temporary shelter, shelter, green architecture, Siberian larch

Lookout Loop, bird watching, observatory, Ulf Mejergren Architects, Latvia, nature park, wooden structure, temporary shelter, shelter, green architecture, Siberian larch

http://ift.tt/2A2Si2p Source: https://inhabitat.com



Man to launch himself in homemade steam-powered rocket to show the Earth is flat

This weekend, one man plans to launch himself 1,800 feet into the air in a steam-powered rocket he made himself from salvaged parts out of his garage – in a quest to prove Earth isn’t round, but flat. “Mad” Mike Hughes, a 61-year-old limousine driver, describes himself on his website as “the only man to in history to design, build, and launch himself in a rocket.” His ultimate goal is to launch several miles above our planet to capture photographic evidence we live on a disc.

Mike Hughes, Mad Mike Hughes, rocket, steam rocket, rockets, steam rockets, homemade rocket, homemade rockets, flat Earth, Earth, NASA

Hughes, a self-styled daredevil who set a Guinness World Record in 2002 for a limousine jump, did fly a homemade rocket a quarter mile over Arizona back in 2014. The flight ended with him dragged from the rocket, and he had to use a walker for two weeks due to his injuries. But now Hughes plans to soar again – this time with the backing of the flat-Earth community.

Related: Man hits 162 mph on homemade rocket trike propelled by rainwater

One of his sponsors is a group called Research Flat Earth. Online outlet The Daily Plane launched a GoFundMe page for Hughes, saying, “Knowing that NASA doesn’t send anyone to space, Mad Mike could be one of the only people up in the air in a rocket.” People have contributed over $7,000 to the page.

Mike Hughes, Mad Mike Hughes, rocket, steam rocket, rockets, steam rockets, homemade rocket, homemade rockets, flat Earth, Earth, NASA

Hughes thinks a conspiracy of astronauts created the image of Earth as a globe. But The Washington Post said Hughes is a recent flat-Earth convert. He didn’t raise much money for a follow-up to his 2014 flight; a Kickstarter campaign with two backers didn’t mention the flat Earth idea. But Hughes said after months of research, he’s now a believer.

Hughes told the Associated Press, “I don’t believe in science. I know about aerodynamics and fluid dynamics and how things move through the air, about the certain size of rocket nozzles, and thrust. But that’s not science, that’s just a formula. There’s no difference between science and science fiction.”

Hughes plans to launch on November 25 over California’s Amboy Ghost Town. He plans to travel around a mile at a speed of around 500 miles per hour.

+ Mad Mike Hughes

Via The Washington Post and the Associated Press

Images via Mad Mike Hughes Facebook and Mad Mike Hughes website

http://ift.tt/2jRSzyu Source: https://inhabitat.com



The gorgeous Roadhaus RV soaks up sunlight with a glass-enclosed roof

From the Wyoming-based company Wheelhaus comes the amazing Roadhaus – a tiny house/RV hybrid that measures 10.5 feet wide and 38 feet long, but feels a lot larger. Wheelhaus wrapped the roof of the wedge-shaped home in glass, so the interior is open, airy and gets plenty of sunlight – something many small houses lack.

Wheelhaus, Roadhouse, tiny house-RV hybrids, tiny house living, off grid living, tiny home design, tiny home on wheels, tiny home rvs, off grid trailers, tiny campers, camper living, glass tiny homes, tiny home trailers, off grid tiny homes, tiny home on wheels, mobile tiny home

The Roadhaus wedge, which comes with a price tag of $76,000, is certified as an RV, meaning it can be towed and parked in any RV park or campground. Its compact size of only 400 square feet provides the option of traveling the world in this beautiful tiny home on wheels.

Related: Solar-powered Tesla Tiny House hits the road in Australia

Wheelhaus, Roadhouse, tiny house-RV hybrids, tiny house living, off grid living, tiny home design, tiny home on wheels, tiny home rvs, off grid trailers, tiny campers, camper living, glass tiny homes, tiny home trailers, off grid tiny homes, tiny home on wheels, mobile tiny home

The little wedge is filled with some seriously smooth design features, namely the use of glass to open up the interior space. The living area, as well as the rest of the home, is flooded with natural light thanks to a spectacular raised roof that is part glass and part wood panels. In fact, the strip of wood panels that run the length of the home seems to float over the interior space.

Wheelhaus, Roadhouse, tiny house-RV hybrids, tiny house living, off grid living, tiny home design, tiny home on wheels, tiny home rvs, off grid trailers, tiny campers, camper living, glass tiny homes, tiny home trailers, off grid tiny homes, tiny home on wheels, mobile tiny home

The tiny home has a comfy living room on one side and a bedroom with sufficient space for a queen-sized bed on the other. The kitchen is a beautiful space-efficient design with a sink and small stovetop, and plenty of crafty storage options. A gleaming bathroom is covered in silver tiles, adding a touch of bright modernity to the home. The entrance to the home is completely wrapped in glass, including the large door that leads out to a wooden deck jutting out from the interior.

+ Wheelhaus

Via Treehugger

Images via Wheelhaus

Wheelhaus, Roadhouse, tiny house-RV hybrids, tiny house living, off grid living, tiny home design, tiny home on wheels, tiny home rvs, off grid trailers, tiny campers, camper living, glass tiny homes, tiny home trailers, off grid tiny homes, tiny home on wheels, mobile tiny home

Wheelhaus, Roadhouse, tiny house-RV hybrids, tiny house living, off grid living, tiny home design, tiny home on wheels, tiny home rvs, off grid trailers, tiny campers, camper living, glass tiny homes, tiny home trailers, off grid tiny homes, tiny home on wheels, mobile tiny home

Wheelhaus, Roadhouse, tiny house-RV hybrids, tiny house living, off grid living, tiny home design, tiny home on wheels, tiny home rvs, off grid trailers, tiny campers, camper living, glass tiny homes, tiny home trailers, off grid tiny homes, tiny home on wheels, mobile tiny home

Wheelhaus, Roadhouse, tiny house-RV hybrids, tiny house living, off grid living, tiny home design, tiny home on wheels, tiny home rvs, off grid trailers, tiny campers, camper living, glass tiny homes, tiny home trailers, off grid tiny homes, tiny home on wheels, mobile tiny home

Wheelhaus, Roadhouse, tiny house-RV hybrids, tiny house living, off grid living, tiny home design, tiny home on wheels, tiny home rvs, off grid trailers, tiny campers, camper living, glass tiny homes, tiny home trailers, off grid tiny homes, tiny home on wheels, mobile tiny home

http://ift.tt/2jV1hw8 Source: https://inhabitat.com



The stuff nightmares are made of:” thousands of bluebottles on Australian beach

A couple happened upon an astounding sight recently while strolling on the beach in Australia. At Barlings Beach in New South Wales, Brett Wallensky and partner Claudia came across thousands of bluebottles, or Portuguese man o’wars, washed up on land. Such a freaky sight could be more common as climate change impacts our world.

Australia, Barlings Beach, Brett Wallensky, bluebottle, bluebottles, Portuguese man o'war, Portuguese man o'wars, nature, ocean, beached, beaching, mass beaching, stranded, stranding, mass stranding, nature, climate change

The couple came across the horde of Portuguese man o’wars in late October. Brett Wallensky, who said he’d been stung multiple times by bluebottles as a boy, said, “There must have been thousands of them beached and they were all alive and wriggling. It was the stuff nightmares are made of…If you fell in there and got that any stings all over you I can’t imagine you would survive…The color of them was just amazing, it is so bright – almost alien.” He said he’d never seen so many bluebottles together in his life.

Related: Thousands of mysterious gelatinous creatures washed up in California

According to The Sydney Morning Herald, each year in Australia over 10,000 people report bluebottle stingings. The venomous creatures deliver painful stings, and according to marine biologist Christie Wilcox of the University of Hawai’i at Mānoa, the stinging cells can still be active for weeks after they’re beached, so even dead bluebottles can cause pain. Wilcox recommended a vinegar rinse and the application of heat to treat a sting.

Australia, Barlings Beach, Brett Wallensky, bluebottle, bluebottles, Portuguese man o'war, Portuguese man o'wars, nature, ocean, beached, beaching, mass beaching, stranded, stranding, mass stranding, nature, climate change

Wilcox told Gizmodo mass beachings can occur when conditions are right, and that there doesn’t seem to be anything special about this specific stranding. But there’s some question of whether climate change will allow Portuguese man o’wars to thrive. According to marine biologist Lisa-ann Gershin, warmer waters amp up jellyfish metabolism, and the creatures live longer and breed more. Bluebottles could benefit from climate change like jellyfish, according to Gizmodo, and beachings could occur more often.

Via Gizmodo, The Sydney Morning Herald, and StoryTrender

Images via Caters Clips on YouTube and Depositphotos

http://ift.tt/2B6NwgP Source: https://inhabitat.com



German slang wraps around MVRDV-designed building for Munich

German architecture takes a playful turn in WERK12, a mixed-use building designed by MVRDV that’s just broke ground in Munich. Located in a post-industrial site in the emerging Werksviertel neighborhood, WERK12 draws inspiration from its industrial heritage and modern graffiti culture. To set the mood for the stylish spaces within, MVRDV teamed up with artists Engelmann and Engl to wrap the building in 5-meter-tall German slang lettering that light up at night.

WERK12 by MVRDV, WERK12 Munich, WERK12 Werksviertel, urban regeneration Munich, MVRDV Munich architecture, WERK12 artists Engelmann and Engl

WERK12 by MVRDV, WERK12 Munich, WERK12 Werksviertel, urban regeneration Munich, MVRDV Munich architecture, WERK12 artists Engelmann and Engl

Located near Munich’s East Station, the 9,600-square-meter WERK12 was commissioned by OTEC GmbH & Co. KG as part of a 40-hectare urban regeneration masterplan that will create approximately 1,200 new homes and up to 7,000 new jobs. The mixed-use building will comprise loft-style offices, restaurants, sports facilities, a skyline swimming pool, and restaurants for nightlife and gastronomy. The façade’s use of giant German words, found in various youth and subculture groups, as public signage is a nod to the graffiti culture and extensive use of signage found around the area.

WERK12 by MVRDV, WERK12 Munich, WERK12 Werksviertel, urban regeneration Munich, MVRDV Munich architecture, WERK12 artists Engelmann and Engl

WERK12 by MVRDV, WERK12 Munich, WERK12 Werksviertel, urban regeneration Munich, MVRDV Munich architecture, WERK12 artists Engelmann and Engl

“WERK12 is totally unique and entirely new for Munich and is a strong contrast to the historic centre just ten minutes away”, says Jacob van Rijs, MVRDV co-founder. “It is a flexible and completely user adaptable building with spaces that can transform over time with bold and expressive texts on the façade are visible from a distance. This transparent building becomes a new focal point on the new Plaza that will form the heart of the Werksviertel.”

WERK12 by MVRDV, WERK12 Munich, WERK12 Werksviertel, urban regeneration Munich, MVRDV Munich architecture, WERK12 artists Engelmann and Engl

WERK12 by MVRDV, WERK12 Munich, WERK12 Werksviertel, urban regeneration Munich, MVRDV Munich architecture, WERK12 artists Engelmann and Engl

Related: China’s new futuristic library is unlike any we’ve seen before

The five-floor building will be optimized for natural daylight and feature tall ceilings and airy, open spaces flexible enough for multiple uses. The high ceilings, all over 5 meter in height, allows for split levels to break up the space and add visual interest. MVRDV pushed the elevator shaft and fire escape stairs to the outside of the building to create the deep and flexible interiors, while turning the outdoor stairways into a focal point punctuated by 3.25-meter-wide terraces. WERK12 is slated for completion in February 2019.

+ MVRDV

WERK12 by MVRDV, WERK12 Munich, WERK12 Werksviertel, urban regeneration Munich, MVRDV Munich architecture, WERK12 artists Engelmann and Engl

WERK12 by MVRDV, WERK12 Munich, WERK12 Werksviertel, urban regeneration Munich, MVRDV Munich architecture, WERK12 artists Engelmann and Engl

WERK12 by MVRDV, WERK12 Munich, WERK12 Werksviertel, urban regeneration Munich, MVRDV Munich architecture, WERK12 artists Engelmann and Engl

http://ift.tt/2zZXHqK Source: https://inhabitat.com



Recycled bedsprings transformed into an art pavilion at Dubai Design Week

Old copper bedsprings have been transformed into a surprisingly chic exhibition space at this year’s Dubai Design Week. Fahed + Architects designed Pavilion Abwab (“doors” in Arabic) to house a curated selection of 47 designs by design talent from the Middle East, North Africa, and South Asia (MENASA). The cloud of mesh metal made of locally sourced materials takes inspiration from nature and showcases the firm’s commitment to environmentally friendly practices.

Abwab by Fahed + Architects, Dubai Design Week 2017, Fahed + Architects Dubai Design Week, recycled bedspring architecture, bedspring pavilion, Dubai Design Week pavilion

Abwab by Fahed + Architects, Dubai Design Week 2017, Fahed + Architects Dubai Design Week, recycled bedspring architecture, bedspring pavilion, Dubai Design Week pavilion

The temporary Abwab pavilion consolidates all the designs into a single space, unlike Dubai Design Week’s former practice of commissioning independent pavilions for six MENASA countries. Designers from 15 different MENASA countries were represented this year at the exhibition that was split into eight categories: interpretation, mimicry, intersection, geometry, tactility, artisanal, nostalgia, and re-use.

Abwab by Fahed + Architects, Dubai Design Week 2017, Fahed + Architects Dubai Design Week, recycled bedspring architecture, bedspring pavilion, Dubai Design Week pavilion

Abwab by Fahed + Architects, Dubai Design Week 2017, Fahed + Architects Dubai Design Week, recycled bedspring architecture, bedspring pavilion, Dubai Design Week pavilion

Related: Beautiful timber pavilion unfolds like origami

Fahed + Architects sourced the used bedsprings from local waste management company bee’ah. A series of interconnected posts supported the cloud of mesh. “Set against a large mass of buildings within the d3 corridors, the structure’s silhouette will be reminiscent of impetuous ocean waves, coral clusters in a reef and clouds in the sky, referencing the practice’s environmental commitment,” reads a statement on Dubai Design Week. “The pavilion will distill daylight to create patterns on the exhibited works and on the ground.”

+ Fahed + Architects

Via Dezeen

Images by Photo Solutions

Abwab by Fahed + Architects, Dubai Design Week 2017, Fahed + Architects Dubai Design Week, recycled bedspring architecture, bedspring pavilion, Dubai Design Week pavilion

Abwab by Fahed + Architects, Dubai Design Week 2017, Fahed + Architects Dubai Design Week, recycled bedspring architecture, bedspring pavilion, Dubai Design Week pavilion

http://ift.tt/2BfHtr8 Source: https://inhabitat.com



RT @guardianeco: Bigotry against indigenous people means we’re missing a trick on climate change https://t.co/ifIBYaevqQ



Elon Musk’s Boring Company asks LA to start digging a tunnel within city limits

Will The Boring Company get the green light from Los Angeles to start digging a traffic-killing tunnel? Elon Musk’s venture recently filed an application with officials for approval to commence digging within city limits. A Boring Company spokesperson said the tunnel could stretch from Hawthorne – where Musk’s other company SpaceX is located – “along the 405 to Westwood, with a number of stops along the way.”

Los Angeles, LA, Los Angeles traffic, traffic, infrastructure, Elon Musk, Musk, Boring Company, The Boring Company, tunnel, tunnels, transportation, alternative transportation, transportation alternatives, green transportation, city, cities

According to Los Angeles’ Bureau of Engineering spokesperson Mary Nemick The Boring Company filed their application, although she and a spokesperson for the mayor said they wouldn’t immediately release the documents. The Los Angeles Times said lawmakers will now face questions about whether or not the city should back a privatized transportation system with new technology, and what type of environmental review there might be.

Related: Elon Musk shows first glimpse of the Boring Company tunnel beneath LA

The tunnel could ultimately link the Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) with the San Fernando Valley. A Boring Company spokesperson said this week the tunnel could transport passengers on electric platforms traveling at speeds as fast as 130 miles per hour. Pedestrians and bicyclists could board a capsule able to carry eight to 16 people. The tunnel’s diameter would be around 12 feet, and it would be funded “entirely with private money,” according to a spokesperson. In an April TED talk, Musk suggested the trip between LAX and Westwood would take a mere six minutes.

Los Angeles, LA, Los Angeles traffic, traffic, infrastructure, Elon Musk, Musk, Boring Company, The Boring Company, tunnel, tunnels, transportation, alternative transportation, transportation alternatives, green transportation, city, cities

Musk also seems ambitious about the time it could take to complete the tunnel: a year or so to stretch along “the whole 405 N-S corridor from LAX to the 101,” he said in a tweet. The Los Angeles Times noted digging is typically the quickest portion of a tunnel project; environmental reviews and permits can take years.

Councilman Mike Bonin invited Boring Company representatives to talk with the City Council next year about the effort, and requested a report on potential policy and regulatory questions. He said in an interview, “So far, in the public imagination, this idea has been at the level of blog posts and cocktail party conversation. We need to flesh it out more.”

Via The Los Angeles Times

Images via Depositphotos (1,2)

http://ift.tt/2hVPnkX Source: https://inhabitat.com



The rustic exterior of this abandoned barn hides a surprising space to get away from it all

This neglected old barn in Norway will now host tourists from all around the world, thanks to its recent makeover helmed by architecture studio OPA Form. The renovated structure features a modern sleeping module that can fit a family of four and offers stunning views of the picturesque valley Myrkdalen on the west-coast of Norway.

Barn renovation, Norway, OPA Form, green addition, modular design, repurpose, green renovation, wooden structure

The architects infused the original wooden building with new life by adding a module that’s practically invisible from the outside. The exterior looks as quaint and rustic as when it was built, 50 years ago. A sculptural window stretches out of the old cladding, offering views of the surroundings.

Barn renovation, Norway, OPA Form, green addition, modular design, repurpose, green renovation, wooden structure

Related: Architects transform 150-year-old Slovenian hay barn into a stunning contemporary home

Inside, authentic rough surfaces still exist, except for a new addition that attaches to main room that once served as a cattle stable. The addition, a module clad in bright aspen with a circular entrance, was built with the utmost precision and with great respect for the history of the place. Completely self-sufficient, the addition doesn’t disrupt the original structure and has a part that stretches up in-between the low beams.

Barn renovation, Norway, OPA Form, green addition, modular design, repurpose, green renovation, wooden structure

The renovation project is part of firm’s strategy called “the barns they are a-changing”, which relates to the efforts in repurposing derelict buildings scattered across the Norwegian west coast.

+ OPA FORM

Via Archdaily

Lead Photo by Virre Dahl

Barn renovation, Norway, OPA Form, green addition, modular design, repurpose, green renovation, wooden structure

Barn renovation, Norway, OPA Form, green addition, modular design, repurpose, green renovation, wooden structure

Barn renovation, Norway, OPA Form, green addition, modular design, repurpose, green renovation, wooden structure

Barn renovation, Norway, OPA Form, green addition, modular design, repurpose, green renovation, wooden structure

http://ift.tt/2Ao3CXo Source: https://inhabitat.com




top